Monday, February 6, 2012

BLOG TOUR # 2 - GUEST BLOG SPOT WITH MARIE LAMBA AUTHOR OF DRAWN



Novels On The Run would like to welcome Marie Lamba author of 'Drawn' and thank her for taking the time to write this wonderful Guest Blog Post.

Marie Lamba (MarieLamba.com) is author of acclaimed young adult novels including What I Meant… (Random House), Over My Head, and Drawn. When she isn’t writing or fantasizing about other times, she’s working as an Associate Literary Agent at The Jennifer DeChiara Literary Agency in NYC.

My review of  DRAWN.

Click HERE for Marie's Blog Tour info page.



Enjoy! 

Michelle



Any Time but the Present

Guest Post by Marie Lamba, Author Of The New Paranormal

Drawn



I’ve always been a sucker for a good time travel tale. A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur’s Court, The Time Traveler’s Wife, and A Knight in Shining Armor are all favorite books of mine. And then there are the flicks: “13 Going on 30,” “17 Again,” “Kate and Leopold,” and the ultimate time travel movie “Back to the Future.”


I think what I love most about time travel is the way it allows me to toy with what it’d be like to visit another time. Not to be someone who lived in that time long ago or far away, but to be myself encroaching on another world. Whenever I visit an old building, a castle, or a ruin, I can’t help but wonder what the people were like back then. Were they very different? Would I connect with them somehow?


If you could go anywhere, or rather, anywhen, when would you go?


I’d end up smack-dab in the Middle Ages. I’d love to see a fully functioning castle, and women whisking about in those elaborate gowns and pointy headpieces, and knights clanking in their armor, and foppish troubadours strumming lutes.


Honestly, that’s one of the fun things about being a writer -- being able to bring your own imaginings to life. In my new novel Drawn, Michelle De Freccio is a practical teen. She’s an artist, but still is someone firmly grounded in reality and the normal. When she moves to England, she keeps drawing pictures of some guy. Then she starts bumping into him at the town’s castle. That’s when things start to get really strange. Michelle refuses to believe he’s actually from another time, or that she’s no longer in the present. She’s convinced he’s just some nut, until this moment in the novel:


“Try taking your meds,” I tell him, stuffing these things back into my bag. “Try not wearing that cape and boots all the time. While you’re at it, why don’t you take up a hobby, like going to Star Wars conventions as a Jedi knight?” I hang the bag over my shoulder and grab my drawing pad. “I’m leaving and if you follow me, I swear to God I’ll scream and you’ll be in prison faster than you can say Society of Creative Anachronism. Got that?”


He flashes a half smile. He’s so attractive. He’s so cocky. I grit my teeth and back away. I’m near the steps. I turn, about to run down, when I see over the wall something far below. My heart seizes up.


No tourists. No tents. No cars. No parking lot. Just grass, a water-filled moat and a deep forest in the distance.


From this point on, Michelle is forced to believe in things she never thought possible. Like the ability to connect with another time. Or how two people from such different times can feel so close. Of course Michelle and Christopher have serious differences in their beliefs and outlooks on life. Like in this scene:


He drinks a few handfuls of water, then sits back. “First you must tell me, do you support the House of York and the true and rightful king? Or are you with the so-called King Henry, that addlepated idiot who is not sane enough to know his own name?”


“You shouldn’t call him an idiot. He’s sick. Like your father was sick.”


“He is nothing like my father,” he says, indignant.


“I mean King Henry is mentally ill. It’s a sickness. It’s pretty sad.”


Christopher snorts, which seriously annoys me.


“Lots of people are mentally ill, Christopher. Lots of good people.” The tremble in my voice makes him look up. “If there was a cure, maybe he would get better and have this really great life.”


“Michelle, I happen to know for a fact that physicians have bled the king and attempted to drive out the demons that possess him, and to no avail.”


“That’s not science. It doesn’t fix anything. You know, some day in the future they’ll come up with all sorts of medicines and treatments that will—”


“You think too much.” He stacks his armor in a neat pile.


“And you don’t think enough. You are so, so…”


I’m about to say “medieval” when Christopher says, “So concerned about getting through every day alive.” He holds up the dented piece of armor to punctuate his point, then throws it clattering to the ground.


One of the most fun things about writing a time travel is tossing in modern stuff and contemporary comments into the mix. Like when Michelle, after watching “Back to the Future” in her own time, goes to Christopher’s time with a book outlining all the battle outcomes of the 1400s. She tells him:


“This book holds all this information about what will happen. In the wrong hands, it could be disastrous. At least according to Hollywood.”


And Christopher responds, “I do not know of this Hollywood person…”


And what does happen with this book? If Christopher uses it, people will live who shouldn’t have, and others will die who shouldn’t have. Quite a mess. Then there’s a scene when Christopher is unconscious from a battle wound, and Michelle tries to save his life with one of those impossibly tiny first aid kits people keep in their purses:


“Okay, modern science to the rescue.” I open the kit and inside are three Band-Aids, a Midol pill, a small foil tube of antibacterial cream and one alcohol wipe. That’s it. I sink onto the chair.



Throughout the novel, the couple faces a ton of challenges as they fall in love. How can they have any sort of life together when every time Michelle sees him, she’s changing destiny in dangerous way? Plus Christopher is “no prince.” His life is intertwined with treachery and murder. And adding to their couple issues is this biggie: every time they kiss, she’s thrown back into her own time.


Can love overcome all of these problems? Should it? Drawn is my way of exploring these questions…and of getting completely lost in past.





About Drawn:


Teen artist Michelle De Freccio moves to England in search of a normal life...instead she finds a hot medieval ghost with a sketchy past.


It all begins when a strange guy appears in Michelle's drawings. When she actually meets him at the town’s castle, she's unmistakably drawn to him. But something is definitely not right. For starters, he wears medieval garb, talks of ancient murders and tends to disappear each time they kiss.


Could he possibly be a ghost? Could Michelle be losing her mind? Or has she simply uncovered a love so timeless it’s spanned the centuries…

Praise for Drawn:

“A lushly romantic ghost story…captivating and haunting. I didn’t want it to end.” –Cyn Balog, author of paranormal YA novels Fairy Tale, Sleepless, and Starstruck

"...a wonderfully spooky tale of romance and discovery. It’s a magical exploration of the unconquerable power of love. Highly recommended!” —Jonathan Maberry, New York Times bestselling author of Rot & Ruin and Dust & Decay

“In DRAWN, Marie Lamba deftly entwines romance and mystery, past and present, into a page-turning adventure. Buy it today and I promise you’ll be finished reading far too quickly!” —Joy Nash, USA Today bestselling paranormal romance author of The Immortals series, The Grail King and The Unforgiven.






9 comments:

  1. Oh my gosh, this book sounds awesome!!! Love love this guest post, thank you for sharing this with us, Michelle! Will have to add this to my TBR! :)

    Celine @ Forget-me-not

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    1. Hi Celine,

      Thanks for your kind words. Happy reading!

      Marie

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  2. You got your wish because you and the heroine share the same name so you can live vicariously through Michelle De Freccio. *giggling*

    If I can time travel I'd go back to Renaissance Italy and Lois XIV in France. I just like the romance of opulence and all those people not bathing hahahahahaha! Kidding on the last part although I'm pretty sure they all stink in the past.

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    1. Hi Braine,

      Yeah, they definitely stank in the middle ages too, but I had Christopher in not one, but two wash up scenes, so mentally I took care of that one ;)

      I'd also love Renaissance Italy. Hm...maybe the next novel? I think I'd skip the Louis XIV thing though. Too many powdered wigs for my taste.

      Marie

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  3. Sorry Celine, you got spammed and I just released it. Erin got spammed too, so I released her to. I don't know why you both got spammed?

    Thanks for dropping by:D

    Michelle

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  4. Thankyou to everybody who has dropped by on my stop. Thankyou Marie for your wonderful comments:D

    Michelle

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    Replies
    1. Hi Michelle,

      Just saw this comment! My pleasure. I loved chatting with you all :)

      Marie

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